Gun deaths in US rise to highest level in 20 years, data shows

The Guardian (13 Dec 2018)

Columbine. Blacksburg. Newtown. Aurora. Tucson. Oak Creek. Charleston. San Bernardino.

Too many communities across the country are still suffering from the heartbreaking consequences of a gun in the wrong hands. In the past decade, more than 100,000 people have died as a result of gun violence. Many of these crimes were committed by people who never should have been able to purchase a gun in the first place. 

Sympathy is not enough to stop gun violence. Congress has repeatedly failed to take action, blocking commonsense reforms supported by the vast majority of the American people – including gun owners themselves.

What the President is Doing to Keep Guns Out of the Wrong Hands, Obama Whitehouse

A steady rise in suicides involving firearms has pushed the rate of gun deaths in the US to its highest rate in more than 20 years, with almost 40,000 people killed in shootings in 2017, according to new figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC’s Wonder database shows that in 2017, 39,773 people in the US lost their lives at the point of a gun, marking the onward march of firearm fatalities in a country renowned for its lax approach to gun controls. When adjusted for age fluctuations, that represents a total of 12 deaths per 100,000 people – up from 10.1 in 2010 and the highest rate since 1996.

Underlying Cause of Death, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Sources

Pilkington, Ed. “Gun Deaths in US Rise to Highest Level in 20 Years, Data Shows.” The Guardian, Guardian News and Media, 13 Dec. 2018, www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/dec/13/us-gun-deaths-levels-cdc-2017.

“Live Updates: What the President Is Doing to Keep Guns Out of the Wrong Hands.” National Archives and Records Administration, National Archives and Records Administration, obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/blog/2016/01/04/live-updates-what-president-doing-keep-guns-out-wrong-hands.

“Underlying Cause of Death, 1999-2017, D48F344.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, wonder.cdc.gov/controller/saved/D76/D48F344.